fun

One who eats alone....

“One who eats alone cannot discuss the taste of the food with others” — African proverb. Let us save you from that fate for at least one night in September! Join us for Mali Rising’s annual Soiree on September 26th at Red Butte Garden in Salt Lake City, and you’ll enjoy an amazing West African-inspired dinner. See what’s on the menu…

Volunteers Send Encouragement to Our Students

Last Saturday I had an incredible time at Salt Lake’s annual Africa Festival. I was there staffing a booth about Mali Rising, and helping people share their notes of encouragement with our students. Despite the heat, dozens of people stopped by the booth to share their thoughts of hope and the value of education. Check out some of the amazing messages in the slideshow.

Inspire Yourself at the 50 Women Mixer!

Our work with our girls in Mali is personally my very favorite part of my job. And part of what I so love about this work is how it lets me connect with great women here in the United States too – women like you who light up whenever we talk about giving girls a chance to change the world. So, I’m really excited about a fun gathering coming up on Friday, August 23 (5:30 to 7:30 pm) here in Salt Lake City – our first ever 50 Women Mixer.

The Way To Our Hearts? A Recipe From Mali

Note: One of the best parts of getting to know another culture is getting to know its food! Hindaty, our wonderful Girls Project Coordinator, shares her one of her favorite Mali recipes for your consideration. This month, I will share with you the recipes of one of my favorite dishes, called "yassa.” Yassa is a dish from West Africa that is prepared with onion. As in Mali we have large families, I will show you the recipe for yassa for 10 people

"Yogoro and Salawalé": Practices that bring cheerfulness to Malian society during the month of Ramadan.

Our Girls Project Coordinator would like to share with you a traditional practice that is happening in Mali during the month of Ramadan. This practice is intended to claim donations (grains and money), but with humor The "Yogoro" for boys and the "Salawalé-walé" for girls is a very old practice whose origin is lost in the dawn of time. This would be as old as our society. Every year in Mali, from the 10th to the 20th night of the month of Ramadan, we witness the influx of children into the streets of cities to indulge in this practice of their fathers, mothers and grandfathers, grandmother, when they were their age. Thus, the tradition was immortalized as generations followed each other.